The Weekly Filet brings you the five best links of the week, every Friday. Making sense of the big issues of our time (with a healthy dose of serendipity and nerdiness). Brought to you by journalist David Bauer. Trawling the web for hidden gems since 2011.
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The Crisis of Conservatism

At a time when we observe two formerly great liberal democracies with increasing horror (USA) and bewilderment (UK), this is a worthwhile commentary on what conservatism has to do with it. While I do think that it is based on a much too favourable view of conservatism’s past mertis, it is spot on when it comes to how conservatism currently abandons its own ideals.

Published in Weekly Filet #321

    To Mend a Broken Internet, Create Online Parks

    Eli Pariser, who had coined the term «Filter bubble» back in 2011, has some ideas on how to create better public spaces online. Spaces that nurture public discourse and allow people to gather in meaningful ways. He doesn’t offer a concrete solution, but rather aims to spark your imagination. All based on the premise that we should not waste our time trying to fix Facebook and co., but look beyond.

    Published in Weekly Filet #321

      There’s little reason to be optimistic about a coronavirus vaccine

      With Covid cases rising sharply in Europe, and going up after never really going down in the US, we’re once again left wondering when all this might end («end» as in: We can behave and move around freely without fear of infecting someone or being infected). This article — don’t be scared away be its attention seeking title — gives a good overview of where we are with vaccines and what still needs to happen.

      Published in Weekly Filet #321

        The Case for Climate Reparations

        Industrial countries have disproportionally caused the climate crisis that developing countries disproportionally suffer from. Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò and Beba Cibralic make a strong case for a «historically informed response to climate migration» that would make the West «grapple with their role in creating the climate crisis and rendering parts of the world uninhabitable.» (I absolutely love the illustration created for this article. Such a great metaphor — one I haven’t seen in this context yet. If you’re unsure what it means, google «Kintsugi»)

        Published in Weekly Filet #321

          Three Scenarios for the Future of Climate Change

          «If you don’t like all of the climate disasters happening in 2020, I have some bad news for you about the rest of your life.» With the pandemic still dominating most of our everyday lives and the crazy man in the white house dominating the news, it’s easy to forget about the biggest issue. One of my favourite writers on climate, Elizabeth Kolbert from The New Yorker, with a short reminder of where we’re at with climate change. And three possible futures.

          Published in Weekly Filet #320

            How to wait well

            A surprisingly interesting and useful guide on how to wait well. Found this a particularly helpful device for shifting your perspective: When waiting for something makes you uncomfortable or annoys you, always ask: Who benefits when you have to wait? Read it now. (If you must, skip to the «Key Points». I’ll let you deal with the irony of your impatience yourself.)

            Published in Weekly Filet #320

              Get Tech the Hell Away From the Trolley Problem

              It starts out as a rant against tech dudes using the most mainstream philosophical thought experiment to figure out who autonomous cars should kill. However, the article goes on to make a broader, more interesting point: It’s an examination of how you cannot extrapolate from a simplistic, highly specific set of insights : «You’re not supposed to build out your entire moral philosophy from your answer to the Trolley Problem.»

              Published in Weekly Filet #320

                All We Can Save

                Just finished it, easily one of my favourite books this year: a collection of essays from women at the forefront of the climate movement. Clear-eyed throughout, alarming where it needs to be, optimistic whenever possible.

                Published in Weekly Filet #320

                  What My Sled Dogs Taught Me About Planning for the Unknown

                  I don’t usually advocate for learning from dogs. But since we humans are not always very good with «negotiating countless shifting variables», we might as well take some canine advice. I mean, this is good advice: «We should ask for support before we need it. We should support others before they ask. Because if you don’t know how far you’re going, you need to act like you’re going forever.»

                  Published in Weekly Filet #320